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The Körber Foundation: Shaping Change

Innovation, international understanding, and a vibrant civil society: The Körber Foundation promotes societal responsibility.

The Hungarian physician Botond Roska receives the Körber European Science Prize 2020, which is endowed with one million euros. Roska revolutionized ophthalmology with his work and is one of the world's leading experts in the study of vision and the retina. Botond Roska has set himself the goal of restoring sight to the blind.

Societal change is successful only if people get involved. The Körber Foundation encourages societal commitment by initiating discussions and testing solutions. The Foundation promotes dialogue between nations and between societal groups in Germany. Further, its activities support an increase in understanding and reflection through science, education, and culture as well as via the reflection of people’s historical origins and identity. 

The Foundation’s work is based on several areas of action: innovation, international understanding, and a vibrant civil society. It currently focuses on the three topics “A new life in exile,” “Technology needs society” and “Keeping Europe together”.

The Foundation was established in 1959 by the entrepreneur and visionary Kurt A. Körber. As an innovative thinker, he not only founded an international technology Group but also laid the cornerstone of the Foundation. 

The Körber Foundation is the sole shareholder of Körber AG, which is part of the Foundation’s assets. The Foundation receives an annual dividend from its equity investment in Körber AG, which it uses exclusively for socially beneficial purposes.

www.koerber-stiftung.de

Culture as a means of education and understanding: A performance by the ensemble “Golnar & Mahan” with the Iranian singer Golnar Shahyar was part of the event series “Ohr zur Welt” (an ear open to the world) in April 2018.
A vibrant civil society: The first “Exile Media Forum” of the Körber Foundation was held in the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg at the end of October. The Turkish journalist Can Dündar, who is living in exile in Germany, opened the Forum with a talk entitled “A Hamburg Speech about Exile.” The Forum brings together German media representatives with journalists who are living in exile.
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